SILENCE = CONSENT

Posts tagged “love

Stay Woke w/ Tuan N’Gai feat. Kevin E. Taylor

Pastor Kevin E. Taylor is one of the most exciting preachers I’ve ever heard.  He’s an author, activist, teacher, inspiration and overall genuinely great person.  Listen to our conversation and find out for yourself.

Stay Woke 004 – Kevin E. Taylor.

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My Wife, My Whore, My Baby Mama

“He said he wants me to be his wife, his whore, and the mother of his children. Then he proposed to me.”  That is something a young lady said on her Facebook page.  She was happy.  Celebrating her new engagement.  But, like clockwork, a firestorm of negative comments rang out from empowered black women.  She was accused of having low self-esteem.  She was berated for letting a man talk to her like that.  How DARE she revel in male misogyny and set the black female struggle back 50 years!  Why did she think it was a compliment?  Why did so many people congratulate her like she had accomplished something great?  I mean, since when did “whore” become a compliment or an aspiration?  Right?

Though I understand the people who disagreed with his choice of words, I have to say I disagree with it.  This is a relationship between a man and HIS woman; a woman and HER man.  Who the HELL are outsiders to tell them what is and is not appropriate in their relationship?  Who died and made anyone else’s opinion relevant to their thing?  If this young lady wasn’t offended, because the word isn’t a negative one within the bonds of her engagement, I think everyone else should just get somewhere and SADDOWN!

I honestly think he was telling her, “Baby, all I need, I’ve found in you.  You are just ALL the woman I need.  For a home-cooked meal and clean house, I can come home to you.  For all the low-down, gutter-butt, freak nasty pornographic fantasies I want fulfilled in the bedroom that I can’t share with anyone else, I know you got me.  There is no other woman I want to bear my seed.  You are EVERY woman to me!”

I think the young man exercised maturity and had the balls to freely say what he loves about her in the most vulnerable and uncensored way.  What’s wrong with that?  If more people had the type of relationship where they were safe and free to say exactly what they felt, HOW they felt it without the threat or fear of judgement, we just may have a better society.  The world needs this type of honesty.  Furthermore, what’s wrong with having a wife (or partner) who is so sexually uninhibited they satisfy every little sexual fetish you have?  What’s wrong with that?

The way I see it, the women who were going in on this young lady were jealous.  They weren’t empowered women at all. They were bitter, insecure, hurt and angry women who probably are in need of a 15-minute toe curling, body-rocking orgasm their damn selves!  When you violently berate others because they don’t agree with your point of view, or don’t know the whole story, that’s not empowerment boo boo, you really need to get off your high horse and live a little.  Maybe if you weren’t so uptight, and were free enough to be someone’s personal whore, you might be getting wifed up to.


Who is Left to Love the Black Woman?

“All the good black men are either dead, married, gay, in jail or waiting to be born,” is something I heard a young lady say in a bible study once.  We were discussing the possibility of some of us in the class never getting married.  Before making this statement, she told the pastor he needed to come up with some programs so some of the women in the class could have the hope of getting married.  She then went on to give a dramatic speech called “Who Is Left to Love the Black Woman?”

I was very offended.  And the whole time she was giving her lil’ speech, I was lookin’ at Mz. Lady like she’d bumped her head.  After her speech, the pastor asked if any of the men in the class would like to respond.  So, you KNOW I raised my hand right?  And the pastor just shook his head, because he KNEW what was coming.

I stood up in front of the class, cleared my throat, and said, “I don’t think the problem here is ‘who’s left to love the black woman, but rather who is qualified!”  I also told Mz. Lady that she owed every man in the class an apology because ALL OF US in the class thought of ourselves as good men.

These days, what IS a good man?  Everyone has their own idea of what makes a man “good,” so it’s difficult to set a concrete definition.  When asked that question, most of the single men I know say they consider themselves good men.

So, if so many people (straight women and gay men) are looking for ‘good men’, why are so many presumed good men single?  Maybe the people who say they are looking for a good man, aren’t  really looking for a good man at all.  Most are seeking out “good-looking men” and are disappointed when they find that those who they think are good-looking often lack the characteristics they say they want in a man.  The truth is, most will totally overlook a man of character if he doesn’t personify what society says is beautiful or successful.  Even if the man is only trying to be a friend, he still faces rejection based on his looks.

My late Big Mama used to say, “baby, you don’t throw away a diamond because it’s given to you in a paper bag, and not a velvet box….a diamond is still a diamond no matter what it may be wrapped in.”  Big Mama knew that a good man couldn’t be measured or judged by what he has or how he looks.  A good man can only be judged by his character.  Now I’m not naïve to the fact that what we see gets our attention.  But it seems that what we see is the most important thing.  We value things that are temporal.  Good looks fade or can be destroyed.  Money and material things are fleeting and can be taken away.  But a strong and noble character is something that is invaluable and will stand the test of time.

So to all those women and men, who say they’re looking for a good man, remember that a good man (a diamond) is still a good man (a diamond) regardless of how he may be wrapped.  Think about it, that man of character that you’ve overlooked because you’re “just not attracted to him” may be the friend or partner you’ve been looking for all along.  Learn how to see people with more than just your eyes.  Maybe the problem is not a shortage of eligible candidates, but your inability to recognize a good man when you see him.

 

Tuan N’Gai is Co-Founder of the Operation: REBIRTH Movement.  He’s the author of “Will I Go To Heaven? The Black Gay Spiritual Dilemma,” “Little Brown Boy’s Blues,” and a contributor to the New York Times Best Seller, “It Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living.” He lives in Chicago, Illinois.


Are You Afraid of My Blackness?

A young man I was mentoring called me to vent about what he perceived as a negative experience.  He was FURIOUS!!!  He was leaving a job interview in a building downtown when he was joined on the elevator by an older white woman.  Though he was professionally dressed, his “swagger” still seemed to show.

According to his account, when the elevator door closed the lady moved as close as she could on the other side of the elevator and clutched her purse, being sure to not make eye contact with him.  He said it was obvious she was afraid.  She honestly thought he would do something to her or try to take her purse.

He was livid that she would think that of him.  “Don’t nobody want that ol’ woman, her p***y, OR her dayum purse!” he said.  He rode the bus and walked home from his stop insulted that someone who didn’t even know him would thing that about him, and would make it known with their actions.

When he finished venting, I asked him to listen to what he told me.  I repeated, “The white woman got on the elevator. When the door closed, she retreated to the opposite side and clutched her purse. Why?  Because she was afraid of you.”

“Yeah”, he said.

I asked him, “when are you gonna realize the power you have?” When will you glory in the fact that as a young black man, your very presence is so intense that it intimidates people who aren’t as strong as you are, and it challenges their ignorance?”

“Dayum!  I didn’t think about it like that,” he responded.

Even though I was in a position to minister to him, this entire scenario was a lesson to me as well.  I should no longer view my blackness as a hindrance or curse. I should embrace and glory in it.  Hell, my blackness is more than beautiful…it’s downright powerful!   The fact that I’m a black man is a gift.  It’s a blessing.  It’s an honor that God saw fit to bestow.  It’s a reason to celebrate.  I also realized that my blackness is a call to responsibility.  The power that black men possess is one that should be used to bless the earth.  When I think of the intelligence and talent we possess, it makes me so proud to be who I am.  I just wish there were more black men who were vocal about their Black Pride.

The funny thing is how white people get afraid, offended and worried about black men having, vocalizing and displaying their pride.  It truly incites fear within their very souls.  I think that fear is a response to their internalized guilt for how we’ve been treated in the United States of Amerikkka.  I think Black Pride is such a bright light that it shows them their inferiority.  Maybe they are afraid because they know if we ever start to walk in all the greatness that lives within us, the white privilege bullshit will end, and the chickens will TRULY come home to roost.

It’s sad to think an entire generation of black men know nothing of their history.  They have no clue of the greatness that is manifested on the earth because of their presence.  I think knowing how Benjamin Banniker, a black man, contributed inventions that changed history would make them proud.  Knowing of Langston Hughes and James Baldwin, black men, giving us literature that transcends time would get them excited.  To know how the athletic accomplishments of Jackie Robinson, Reggie Jackson, Arthur Ashe, Mohammed Ali and Michael Jordan revolutionized sports forever is simply amazing.  To have knowledge of  Medgar Evers, Malcolm X,  Bayard Rustin, Dr. MLK,  and countless other civil rights icons would make them proud of their blackness.  To know of men like Thelonius Monk, James Cleveland, Quincy Jones, Herbie Hancock, Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Prince and countless others who personify musical excellence and genius, would be an inspiration.

Having the opportunity to mentor younger black men has helped me realize that we, as a black men, cannot allow the fear or ignorance of others to make us think negative things about ourselves.  We cannot allow anyone but us to define who we are.  We cannot accept what the media says about black men as our personal truth, but rather present such a positive and powerful image they can’t help but tell the truth we want told.

It’s time we get back to teaching our sons, nephews and cousins about the greatness from whence they come.  We have to embrace the beauty in our diversity.  We can no longer use the evil perpetrated by white men as an excuse to dwell in mediocrity.  We have to accept our blackness as a “something extra” that God gave us to succeed, whether white men are afraid of it or not.


I CALL BULLSHIT!

Now that the warm and fuzzy “Kum Ba Yah” moment we had while remembering those who perished in the 9/11 tragedies is over, maybe the United States of Amerikkka can get back to the sexist, classist, racist, homophobic, divisive culture we know and love.

I call bullshit!  Amerikkka’s “we’re all one nation under GOD” pseudo-sentimentality during a national remembrance of 9/11 is about as sincere as knocking little old people over at Walmart during a black Friday  sale.  One Nation Under GOD me ass!

That is all.


Realness

GENTLEMEN, START YOUR ENGINES, AND MAY THE BEST WOMAN WIN!

RuPaul’s Drag Race is one of my favorite shows on television.  Anyone who knows me will be able to attest to that fact.  I’m always intrigued by the Creativity, Uniqueness, Nerve and Talent that most drag queens possess.  Their being able to transform and create the female illusion is the ultimate for me.  One of my favorite contestants this past season was Mariah Balenciaga.  HUN-T WAS FIERCE!!!  Mariah captured everything that is femininity and presented it with class, elegance and REALNESS.  To me, she pays true homage to the feminine.  To me, the realness factor is paramount.

One thing most drag queens have is quick whit and sharp tongues.  It’s really an endearing quality.  And I love the ones who “keep it real”.  Keeping it real, one would assume would be defined as one always having the courage to be truthful, to walk in integrity.  “Realness” would be a good thing.  In a perfect world, whether in full geech or in real life, being able to truly serve realness should be something we all aspire to.  But more often than not, like good drag, what is perceived as “realness” is just an illusion.  For some people, their realness is just as deep as the makeup and costumes they would wear to lipsinc for their lives.

In this day and age, it seems like people actually prefer illusion to realness.  What does it say about us?  Have people become so jaded that we’d rather present and celebrate illusions than living authentic lives?  Has “keeping it real” become an illusion itself?

Too often in gay culture, we see people say and do mean and hurtful things to other people.  It’s normal.  In fact the arrogance and cattiness is expected and seen as just a part of being gay.  But does it really have to be that way?  It’s one thing to read someone for pure filth because they are coming for you and you haven’t sent for them… that’s merely self defense.  But it’s quite another to just be mean and hateful.

Usually the mean and hateful queens are truly insecure little boys (or girls) who are trying to present the illusion that they are grand.  People who are ALWAYS in “reading mode” or are always catty are trying to hide something.  They are trying to hide the fact that what they are presenting is not reality.  In fact, their reality is too hard for THEM to deal with, so they treat others badly trying to make themselves feel better about their own lives.  It’s really sad when you think about it.  When it’s easier for a person to attempt to live their illusion than present a real person to the world, there’s a big problem.  It’s dangerous for the lines of realness and illusion to be blurred.

One thing about drag, when it’s done well, it’s very entertaining.  Being able to serve realness is indeed a beautiful thing.  And from what I understand, one can make MAD coins.  But when the music stops, when the deejay and the crowd goes home, and the lights go out, the illusion stops and real life begins.  Sure, we all have a persona that we present to the world.  Thing is, what we present to others should be the real us, not an illusion or a character we’ve created.  If one truly has the courage, keeping it real is more beautiful than any illusion will ever be.  If only more people understood that.

In the classic movie “To Wong Foo: Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar”, the late Ms. Vida Boheme taught us one valuable lesson that everyone must learn to live… REAL queens always use their powers for good, and in every situation, seek out the opportunity to help others.  THAT my dear, is better than the best illusion.  It’s realness at its finest.


Liberating Oppression???

I really have issues with church people who always thumping their Bibles, because they come across as morons.  They just go about spouting whatever they’ve heard their pastor say, and it’s often without the benefit of scholarship.  Meaning, they take scripture at face value without thinking.  They call it “walking by faith”.  For instance, if they’re reading the book of Romans, they take no account of what was going on in Rome.  They don’t consider who wrote the book to see if what was written was due to an eye-witness account or if they are writing about what they were told.   They often don’t seek God for the spiritual application of what they’ve just heard or read.  Unfortunately in most churches it is “the Bible says, the Bible says, the Bible says,” and that’s it. Is it not the responsibility of the pastor to equip their people with the tools necessary to not only study the good book, but to think critically about what they are reading?  Isn’t the preaching of the Gospel supposed to evoke a hunger and thirst for the truth and righteousness?  Shouldn’t the preaching of the Gospel challenge one to seek knowledge of the truth for themselves?  In other words, question everything!  Nothing should be above questioning.  I mean, if you’re going to try to live you life according to what you are being taught, doesn’t it make sense to have a good understanding of those principles?

The church should be teaching people how to know GOD for themselves.  The church should teach people that GOD’s Word is relevant to their personal lives, and the Bible is a map that if used properly, can lead them to the truth.  It shouldn’t be forced on people and crammed down their throats like the so-called “Christian” founding fathers did to the Native Americans and African slaves.  Yeah, I said it!  The Bible is a book that was forced upon people in order to keep them afraid and under control.

It’s like this, when America was “discovered” and slaves brought over from Africa, the Native Americans and Africans had their own language, culture, and understanding of God.  But white supremesists felt their understanding of GOD was better than that of the “savages” they both kidnapped and were colonizing. So with their guns and whips, they punished or killed people publically in order to convert the “savages” so they could easily steal their land and rob them of their resources.  Eventually, the witnesses of this brutality decided to not accept this new religion, but said, “Okay Mr. white man, I’m going to make you believe that I believe what you’re saying about this person named Jesus even though I’ve never heard of Him, nor do I have proof that he existed.  I just want the beatings and killings to stop.”  Upon their profession of Jesus,  magically the beatings stop, and the scary white man isn’t so violent. That’s how the “good Christian colonizers” got the Native Americans and Africans under control.  That SAME agenda is being pushed on Africans today.

So let’s approach the Bible with the understanding that it (and Christianity) was forced upon Native Americans and Africans who accepted Christianity as a means of survival and obtaining freedom from enslavement, not necessarily because they really believed it.  And ANY and ALL documentation of the Native American or African cultures or religions were destroyed in an attempt to obliterate the fact that they existed as credible faith based systems.  Is it really okay to take a book that doesn’t speak very favorably about anyone but “white people” as the cornerstone of how we live our lives?  Is this really a credible reference to lead us to GOD or lead us to a better understanding of who GOD is?

The Bible itself says nothing clean can come from  unclean things.  Jesus said a tree is known by fruit it bears, and a bad tree cannot produce good fruit.  So if what was forced upon us was oppressive in nature, can we really have liberation or salvation?  Or is this really just an oppressive system that we we bought into just to “make the beatings stop”?

If Christianity is all about liberty and freeing people in Christ, I think it is safe to say one  can’t honestly call themself a Christian if total liberation it’s not the fruit of their labor.  And not just liberation from sin, because Jesus took away the sins of the world when he died and rose again.  I think we need to talk more about being saved from poverty.  What about being saved from abuse?  What about being saved from oppression?  We can’t talk about those issues because the church system as we know it, by its very nature is oppressive.   We say we believe that there is freedom in Christ, but we don’t live it.  We don’t really believe it.  That’s why the so-called “lost people” see our lives and call us hypocrites. Our lives don’t speak liberation.  At the very core of our spiritual walk is opression.